Meira III The Gilgamesh Syndrome

Meira III has become long overdue due, in part, to distractions in world events but more so to the increasingly obvious need for radical change to the capitalist democracies predominate in first world nations. Why should that effect a work fiction? Because Meira is our paragon of common sense unhindered by preconceptions and conformity. From the time Christopher Jordan first realised that the Ancients had good working knowledge of solar energy he knew established historians would never accept his conclusions. Rather than combat the existing order he decided to by-pass it with credible fiction which we centred around an heroine with exceptional powers – Meira.

Unlike the unbelievable sock, bam, pow, of the American superheroes Meira is a work in progress – she grows in skills and wisdom as her adventures carry her ever nearer to her destiny. She grew from the angry young woman in Book I, Looking for Father, to the adventuress harnessing the power of the oceans in Book II, The Seahorse. 

In Book III, The Gilgamesh Syndrome she progresses to the heiress proper – ultimately fulfilling her role and accepting the huge responsibility descending upon her.

While looking for answers in the ancient city of Aleppo is she caught up in terrorist activity but rescued by agents of her old enemy The Federation of Fossil Fuel Purveyors – FFFP. She returns to Mesopotamia, this time to Damascus, becomes entangled in the war raging there and is whisked away to southern Iran where a hidden city has been revealed by a commercial mining group. It is a staggering find of far greater value than of the city she visited in the Karakorum Mountains in Book I, and harnessing more power than the Sea Horse of Book II.

With her old friends, Ben and Peter, to help her, and her old enemy Commander Conway to protect them, she studies the architecture of the living city and the recorded texts only she can understand.

In Part II of Book III Meira is armed with knowledge of the Ancients stretching back to 100,000 BCE.

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